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Which cylinder valve

Discussion in 'Dive Equipment' started by kevin b, Mar 28, 2018.

  1. kevin b

    kevin b Member

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    I have just bought a new Apeks cylinder without a valve so the question is should I get a valve the same make as the cylinder or will any make do. Cylinder is just for normal air not nitrox.
     
  2. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
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    Any make will do.

    Is it an old cylinder or new? If old, be aware of the old thread type. If new, no problems.

    As it happens the Apeks valves have a generally good reputation. But they're expensive. MDE are the typical standard valve and are fine.
     
  3. kevin b

    kevin b Member

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    New cylinder.
     
  4. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
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    Any make just ensure it's a Din with a Din-plug fitted.

    This might seem obvious nowadays, but I know someone who bought a cylinder last year
    that had one of the pseudo dins that look like they have one, but don't. He had it replaced,
    but worth checking.
     
  5. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
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    Small tip...

    There's basically two types of valve, 'normal' and modular. The modular valves have a short bar sticking out opposite the valve handle (that's where a manifold valve would go if it were a twinset). These modular valves are much easier to pick up with one hand and a lot less stressful on the valve compared with picking it up by the valve handle. Modular valves are handed, so you need a "right hand" one (if you're facing the din hole, the valve would be on the left, the 'horn' on the right.
     
  6. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
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    Where are myth-busters when you need them :)

    In the past 2 decades I've had not far off 50 single cylinders to look after with the total number of modular
    valves being zero and yet despite this and the way that they are thrown around and misused by students
    "stressing" the valve by lifting, not one has EVER failed because of this.



    .
     
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  7. Dave Whitlow

    Dave Whitlow Well-Known Member

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    :rolleyes: That sounds a bit like the one about the manifold of a twinset being too weak to lift the set (whilst being strong enough to contain over 3000psi).
     
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  8. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
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    We need to start a dive myth list :)
     
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  9. joe90

    joe90 Member

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    How about leaving your valve fully open damages it and can make it stick if you dive deep.

    Sent from my HUAWEI TIT-AL00 using Tapatalk
     
  10. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
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    Ahh not a myth factually accurate, but that was about 20 years ago at least :)

    Given that the very latest HSE warning advice that older alli cylinders are tested following a serious
    incident in the UK last year, it follows that some divers are still using older cylinders in alli and steel
    that also have older valve, which can stick, hence the back-off turn.

    Which means less of a myth and more true, but consigned to the 'if you still own really old kit' list :)
     
  11. joe90

    joe90 Member

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    I was aware it used to be an issue, but that was before they invented colour right? None of my tanks, or a any gear for that matter is that old.

    I guess there is no reason there wouldnt still be stuff of that age in use if its been cared for.

    Sent from my HUAWEI TIT-AL00 using Tapatalk
     
  12. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
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    Wondered why my twinset valves broke. Might have been through getting cold when it was emptied, but I'm sure lifting by the valve knobs doesn't do it any good.

    Since dicking around with this sidemount malarkey, I've got several cylinders with the 'T' bar modular valves. They're *much* easier to lift than a normal stage cylinder valve.

    Why do people fit handles to their cylinders?
     
  13. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
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    This will upset the purists, but adding a small strop of 25mm webbing in a loop fixed to the bottom
    bolt of the bottom band creates a handle and makes carrying a doddle by cradling and lifting.
    This tucks away in the V-when not in use, so no big deal and no messing with manifolds :)

    Or you could just lift using the stage kit in a similar (but not the same) way as the strop.

    Because if it's the right type of handle (not all are) it's by far the easiest way to lift a single,
    but a real plus is that it's very effective to use when doing a rescue.
     
  14. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
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    Generally sidemount cylinders (not always, I've limited experience....) are rigged quite differently to stage cylinders.

    On a stage there's generally a rope line running up from the lower boltsnap inside a small hosepipe up to the neck which has another bolt snap tied to the neck. The hosepipe makes a convenient handle (to the uninitated - stretches the rope and can move the lower jubilee clip.

    Sidemount just has the bottom bolt snap and no upper boltsnap near the neck, nor does it have a pipe "handle" (which isn't a handle, it's primarily to lift up the rubber bungee). There's one or two rubber bungee/snoopy loops on the cylinder, depending on the side) Therefore the 'T' modular valve makes it much easier to hold the neck when moving the tins around.

    But if carrying them to a site I'll put them in a large tackle bag and carry that.


    As for lifting twinsets into a car boot, the concave tins are massively easier to manhandle and carry diagonally. Round bottomed twinsets are quite awkward to carry, so your rope 'tip' seems pretty useful.

    I know this sidemount stuff is a tedious faff, but when lugging individual tins around it's so much easier.
     
  15. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
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    Imagine a cylinder being placed on outstretched arms, hug it while grabbing bottom bolt-snap in the right hand.
    No need to carry by the valve. Can also add a strop of a loop of 25mm webbing through the boltsnap D-ring as a handle.
     

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