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SPGs on a rebreather

Discussion in 'Technical Diving' started by clique, Apr 4, 2017.

  1. clique

    clique Active Member

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    Ello,

    Perhaps a contentious query here. What're peoples opinions about gauges on the rebreather? Keep the SPGs, or put on some button gauges?

    Mike
     
  2. Doomanic

    Doomanic Dinosaur Wrangler
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    Good question and one that I recently pondered myself as my Dil gauge is older than @nickb and about as reliable as @Wibble ;)

    Button gauges are a simple, elegant solution and certainly preferable to no gauges but, and it's a big but, how do you read them on the dive? Do you even need to?
    As I have a BOV I eventually opted to replace like for like and purchased new AP gauges, complete with hoses, as I'd like some warning that I need to switch to my offboard other than the reg going tight...
     
  3. clique

    clique Active Member

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    Well, you can't read them on the dive. You can before, so you'll know you're going in with some gas...

    I check it two or three times on the dive? The key one for me, is checking it when I get to the bottom of the shotline / start of the deep part of the dive and confirm that hell doesn't break loose on the way down. Maybe I should be checking them more often?

    Although removing them would make diagnosing where a leak is more difficult.

    I've not got a BOV, so that's not a worry for me. But if I did, I'd keep the SPG.
     
  4. Dave Whitlow

    Dave Whitlow Well-Known Member

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    For CCR gauges that can be read at all times are, IMHO, essential and button gauges are fine for suit bottles and drop bottles and not much else.

    If there is any sort of gas release it is useful to know how much gas remains.

    A diluent flush at depth can use a lot of gas so there are circumstances where it might be useful to know your surface buoyancy options.

    When I get to 6m on long dives, or to test my cells, I like to flush oxygen through the loop until I get the high oxygen alarm. Before this I prefer to check my O2 remaining as it might be inconvenience to run out of O2 without warning.

    For those who insist button gauges are the way forward ask them if they skim their lime and repack it too as there are also people who think that is a good idea.
     
  5. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
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    Did the great SPG buy plan in the other place come to any conclusion on the minimum quantity of gauges to get a good price?

    It all seemed to fall apart on the two sizes and two pressures.
     
  6. Vanny

    Vanny Active Member

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    I've kept mine. The only thing I've done is run them down to clip off at the bottom edge of the back plate. Bit like O/C or a JJ. Keeps them out of the way and less hoses coming over my shoulder ( AP BMCL) but easy enough to un clip and check. I've found I usually look at them once on a dive , just for piece of mind. Wouldn't feel comfortable not being able to check.
     
  7. furryman

    furryman hmmmm
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    That's an idea... I might try that one. The dangly things at the front are becoming more annoying as time goes on.
     
  8. nickb

    nickb Active Member

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    I'm not convinced at all about the need for SPGs to be available during a dive. My MOD1 instructor doesn't use them and he knows more about rebreather diving than I and probably everyone else on this forum will ever know.

    I've varied between using them and not doing so and am currently using them only because I bought some very sexy glow-in-the-dark gauges which look great.

    The only advantage for me is that I can check what's in my cylinders before diving without having to lie the unit down to look at the button gauges. In 7 years of CCR diving, I've run out of onboard O2 twice and onboard diluent once. None of those events was anything more than a minor inconvenience.
     
  9. Doomanic

    Doomanic Dinosaur Wrangler
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    @clique if you're thinking of getting new gauges, don't get them from Divers Warehouse.
     

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