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Padi OW - What Next

Discussion in 'New to Scuba Diving' started by reefer, Jun 12, 2017.

  1. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
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    The buoyancy and SMB. Buoyancy is the hardest skill to master, so the more you've the opportunity to practice the better. You'll always need to be able to launch an SMB in the UK if you're diving in the sea -- only way the boat will find you!

    Once you use a camera underwater you'll quickly realise that you've missed the dive! Like those people at concerts who watch a band through their phone screen.

    Diving's like nothing else I've ever done before. It relies on certain core skills which can be challenging to master and go titsup very quickly. Some people take to it quickly, others need to persevere (that'll be me).

    But it's so rewarding and massively worth it. After hundreds of dives I still get a massive buzz out of being weightless and moving in three dimensions. Same with looking at all that sea life...
     
  2. jb2cool

    jb2cool Moderator
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    I'd honestly skip the photography one unless you are passionate about photography and the instructor is good at it. I don't know if i'd bother with SMB either, yes you need to be able to launch one but for PADI to class this as an experience dive is a bit rich.

    For sure
    Deep - Yes
    Nav - Yes
    Piss Poor Buoyancy - Yes

    Choose between
    MultiLevel - Might improve your dive planning skills
    Night - A good experience in 'safe' surroundings
    Wreck - As you'll likely be diving on wrecks a lot
    Drift - This may include DSMB as well as teac you about drift dives

    Speak to your instructor about your interests and they may be able to suggest something.
     
    reefer likes this.
  3. Griffalo

    Griffalo Active Member

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    I've done the full photography speciality and while I really rated it for what I learnt about underwater photography we didn't touch buoyancy. There might have been a sentence in the manual about making sure your buoyancy is sorted but that was about it.
     
  4. JohnL

    JohnL Well-Known Member

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    I did a night dive, which convinced me that I didn't like them and haven't done another. Visibility crap due to sand kicked up by people in front, buoyancy rubbish and I finished up with a handful of sea urchin spines.:hurting: I've done a drift by accident (surprise current in Barbados) and found that a very different experience and wrecks for the first time there. I agree with jb2cool's "for sures".

    I took my gopro look-alike for the first time and found that I could concentrate on some fish and keep an eye on what was going on around me. Trying to keep a smooth video forced me to an unusual breathing pattern of a fast breath in and slow out - it worked and I guess my buoyancy must have been working well. I think there are other dives that would be better.
     
  5. reefer

    reefer Member

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    Thanks for everyone's suggestions.

    I'm thinking

    Deep
    Nav

    Piss Poor Buoyancy
    Wreck

    and Dry Suit ??


    Now, I realise that I won't get a shiny Dry Suit ticket if I just do the Dry Suit adventure dive - but thats no problem (well, I don't think it is !) as I will just buy a Sea Skin - no need to hire.

    Are there any drawbacks to doing Dry Suit as an elective? I'm certain BSAC will give me dry suit training at some point too.
     
  6. jb2cool

    jb2cool Moderator
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    It's a reasonable plan. It'll at least give you an experience with a drysuit and some basic training to go with it
     
  7. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
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    Don't see the point to be honest.

    Sport has Drysuit as part of the course with no extras, Nav is compass work and again that's in Sport.
    PPB, well that's a big part of sport as well as line laying, SMB and DSMB all skills great for a wreck
    which is pretty much on every dive anyway.

    Only thing missing is deep and for good reason in that Sport has way more content on deep diving and
    doesn't kid you up that a bounce past 18m in any way makes you a 30m diver.

    Sorry waste of time, just get on and do BSAC Sport.
     
  8. reefer

    reefer Member

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    Got a reasonable discount on the advanced open water.

    The way I see it, its purely a little more experience with an instructor. I would in no way to consider myself to be advanced. I'd be pretty reckless to think I could dive to 30 metres on the basis of a bounce at Caperwray. ( I wonder if people actually do those kind of drive without the experience)

    Reading the aow manual, I'm surprised some of the stuff isn't included in the OW course - certainly the whole first chapter titled "Thinking like a Diver", and the stuff about Dive - Situation - Communication. This isn't advanced - its pretty darn basic important stuff for all new divers I would have thought.

    Hopefully OW + AOW are the foundations I can build on with further experience and then training.

    BSAC suggested I just go out and dive with them up until Christmas, at that point I can do all the Sports Diver Theory (not sure how much work that entails); and the practicals when it warms up a little.

    Seems like a reasonable proposition from the club. I will have only done 4 ow + 5 aow dives when I join (well also 2 follow up try dives at 12 metres in Lanzerote if I count them too);
     
  9. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
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    Yeah if its cheap that's different.

    Treat it as 5 dives where you'll get some experience even if that's just kitting up etc.
    It will all be reviewed again when you do Sport anyway.

    Wouldn't bother with any speciality top-ups like Drysuit & Nitrox etc, get all those anyway as part of Sport.
     
  10. pitdiver

    pitdiver Active Member

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    As a matter of interest my wife did her AOW straight after her OW. This was some time ago she was told that she was qualified to 40 mts. However since then she has never gonna deeper than 30 mts. She has said it's highly unlikely she would go below OW depths now as she feels there is enough to see in the shallows.
     
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  11. reefer

    reefer Member

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    Dispite getting some discount on the AOW, for me I feel I didn't really gain much from it. yeah I know some of you told me so :wtf:

    I won't get into why on a public forum. For me, any further courses won't be from PADI.

    On reflection, I possibly would have been better putting the money towards something like GUE fundamentals (still something I'm looking at although the required equipment appears prohibitively expensive for my stage in the hobby) - or even just going out diving with regulars from the club (I'm already doing this)

    I also have the BSAC Sport course to do over the Christmas period, - I'm told that is good.
     
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  12. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
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    @reefer Fundies is good, great even, but doing it too early isn't such a good idea as it's very hard work if you're struggling with the basics (as was the case with me).

    You can migrate your kit to DIR standards gradually: wing & backplate with single tank adapter, then longhouse, then twinset (probably a change of wing too), then torch...
     
  13. reefer

    reefer Member

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    Are you a GUE diver now then Wibble?

    Was it the rec pass your went for, or a tech pass on fundamentals?

    There is a nice video on You Tube with a Swedish GUE instructor taking a Fundamentals class

    ( ).

    This video has really opened my eyes to be honest.
    The group of students on the film sounded inexperienced from what they were saying prior to the start of the course, and evolved to er - competent beginners?

    I guess, some people are more inclined to naturally pick up skills that others. I'm not sure yet what category I fall into.


    Out of interest, if I went down the single cylinder route. From what I am reading the backplate and wing would only be compatible with the single cylinder - ie they are designed for a specific use.
    If I wanted to move to double cylinders, I would need to purchase a new backplate and wing (Presumably I could re-use the harness)?

    I suspect this sort of training is going to be better suited to me in another year or so. But, at least if I have an idea - I can steer any equipment purchases now towards GUE standards (ie get Scuba Pro or Hollis F1 fins) etc.

    Someone told me this hobby wasn't cheap. :whistling:
     
  14. reefer

    reefer Member

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    actually, that link I posted is for students on Rec 1 I think.

    Fundamentals is harder then?
     
  15. jb2cool

    jb2cool Moderator
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    Backplate is the same between singles and doubles so the only real thing that needs changing is the wing and adding an additional 1st stage regulator.

    Before you go too far down this route, check that GUE is for you, it isn't for everyone (I like it BTW).

    Rec1 is kind of like PADI Open Water and GUE Fundamentals rolled into one.
     
  16. splinter

    splinter Active Member

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    Re. Backplate and wing, if that's what you decide to go for, if you eventually move to twinset, all you'd need is a new wing. The harness threads through the backplate, the wing is then sandwiced between the cylinders and backplate.

    With most single wings, you'd need a single tank adapter and some cambands. You don't need these with twins as they bolt directly to the backplate.

    You'd also need another first stage reg and probably some different length hoses too.

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk
     
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  17. Doomanic

    Doomanic Dinosaur Wrangler
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    Except it doesn't allow you to progress to Tec1 without actually doing Fundies.
     
  18. reefer

    reefer Member

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    interesting stuff.

    Is there such a thing as a compliment GUE dry suit - or does it just have to be dashing black ? :geek:
     
  19. Doomanic

    Doomanic Dinosaur Wrangler
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    No and, surprisingly, no.
     
  20. JohnL

    JohnL Well-Known Member

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    I am certain that I'm going to stay on one cylinder, with or without a pony*. Would a change to wing and backplate be worth thinking about?

    *Nick, the guy I dived with today, dives with a pony and a 15l tank. With me with 12l tank and 190bar, a maximum depth of 5m, he had lots of air available but made it quite clear the pony was staying. To be fair, he lost Inge and I when I had a problem and she helped, and was suddenly 30m away. I guess a free flow regulator and a flooded dry suit at that time could just have made it necessary.
     

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