1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

PADI Open Water woes...

Discussion in 'New to Scuba Diving' started by VintageGt, Aug 31, 2017.

  1. VintageGt

    VintageGt Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2017
    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    10
    Thanks Furryman. Regarding the two dives in one palava, when we surfaced from dive 1 we did an air check and my wife was down to 80psi. It was decided to go back down for dive 2 and when we came out she had 30 bar left. It was a shore dive and we weren't far out but that also seems a little iffy given our first time in the sea.
     
  2. NickPicks

    NickPicks Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2010
    Messages:
    378
    Likes Received:
    127
    An instructor let her go back in with 80 Bar?! And come out with 30?! Unless that was only a 5 minute "weight check with nearly empty tanks" to about 2 metres, that's outrageous!
     
    VintageGt likes this.
  3. VintageGt

    VintageGt Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2017
    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    10
    Yeah, not great really is it? :facepalm:
     
  4. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2014
    Messages:
    1,663
    Likes Received:
    590
    For an open water training dive the student must spend the majority of time at a depth of at least 5 metres
    and breathe at least 1400 litres or remain submerged for at least 20 minutes.

    5 metres = 1.5 bar (average SAC of 25lts/min) 25x1.5 = 37.5.
    30bar (80-50 reserve) x12 (size of cylinder) = 350lts (available gas)

    360 / 37.5 = 9.6 minutes

    That's based on the average gas consumption which for a new and nervous trainee in even benign conditions
    could well be optimistic. With these calcs any dive would be well outside of PADI standards.

    If this was as has been suggested a weight check dive or single skills repeat then sure that's ok as it's not classed
    as a dive as such, but as an actual dive to complete those required for the course it is not.
     
    VintageGt likes this.
  5. Cornish Joss

    Cornish Joss New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2017
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    2
    Terrible to read you had that experience. It is a shame to start your diving off like that! I would definitely recommend you and the wife stick with it!

    As for the training it's all about the instructor not the governing body. I used to be with PADI an completed my open water and advanced close together.. which poking back I don't think is always the best thing to do (depending on the individual)

    I am now with SSI which I feel you have to prove yourself a little before you can progress to the next course. This is just personal choice though, and like I said, get the right instructor and it won't matter who you train with.

    Good luck in progressing further though! It is definitely not the 'norm' with what you had.

    Sent from my PLK-L01 using Tapatalk
     
    VintageGt likes this.
  6. timmyg

    timmyg Super Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2014
    Messages:
    354
    Likes Received:
    157
    There is a breach of standards, and needs to be reported. The standards are clear in the instructor manual which states what should be completed in terms of theory and practical. Ie, a particular dive must be conducted after a particular theory lesson has been completed. But, it is flexible. Ie, you can do a mixture of theory and practical, or, get all the theory done first then go diving.

    Additionally, each dive must be completed before moving onto the next. So for example, if dive 1 had 10 skills, but you only did 8. You need to go back in for a dive and complete the remaining 2 skills before getting out, and then starting dive 2.

    Sorry to hear about your experience.

    TG
     
    VintageGt likes this.
  7. Alex Denny

    Alex Denny Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2016
    Messages:
    254
    Likes Received:
    61
    Incidentally, the qualification IS to a max 18m. As said above, it must be done at more than 5m. In the UK, lakes at 7 or 8m are very common. What the page in the book is saying is that your training will have taken place at 18 or less metres. It's a good idea to build up depth a bit at a time but no dive centre will reject your OW cert for dives to 18m.
     
    VintageGt likes this.
  8. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2014
    Messages:
    1,663
    Likes Received:
    590
    Course not, they get to charge more money to do a couple of work-up dives to 18m,
    a depth that should have been done on the original OW course anyway :p
     
    VintageGt likes this.
  9. VintageGt

    VintageGt Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2017
    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    10
    My point entirely. As you say, it doesn't take long to see through it for exactly what you've said here. :thumbup:
     
  10. VintageGt

    VintageGt Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2017
    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    10
    Thanks Alex. After almost 2 weeks I did get a response from PADI and it is entirely what you say here. I still maintain that this is quite different from what it says in the book and think PADI should change the way it is worded. It's a tad confusing, especially for anyone completely new to this.
     
  11. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2014
    Messages:
    1,663
    Likes Received:
    590
    Same applies to AOW, don't need to get anywhere near 30m, i've known AOW signed off at 19m !!!
     
  12. hawk

    hawk Doing It Rong
    UKD Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2012
    Messages:
    1,360
    Likes Received:
    482
    Whereas I actually did get taken to 30m and was properly narked.
     
  13. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2014
    Messages:
    1,663
    Likes Received:
    590
    Ha 30m :)

    I did AOW when 40m was standard (42m absolute & no deep speciality), so that's what we did :p
    Never would have thought to do a grade shallower than what it says n the card.
     
  14. VintageGt

    VintageGt Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2017
    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    10
    I think I'm going to take a step back, try and get my dry suit spec over the winter and look at AOW in the spring. Its been enough headaches getting the OW and I've heard very varying opinions about the merits of doing AOW immediately or having a break in between to gain a little experience. All personal preference I guess.
     
    JohnL likes this.
  15. JohnL

    JohnL Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2015
    Messages:
    886
    Likes Received:
    373
    Sounds like a plan and, best of all, your plan.:)
     
  16. furryman

    furryman hmmmm
    Staff Member UKD Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,970
    Likes Received:
    486
    With a different instructor?:whistling:
     
    VintageGt likes this.
  17. hawk

    hawk Doing It Rong
    UKD Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2012
    Messages:
    1,360
    Likes Received:
    482
    Personally I'd take a different route. Having decided that you don't want to do AOW immediately (the usual driver for sticking with PADI) I'd suggest you find a BSAC club and do Sport Diver - which will train you to greater depths than AOW and give you what would be chargeable extras on top of AOW. Notably drysuit, nitrox, smb and rescue.

    You can do the theory and meet new buddies over the winter and do the dives in the spring (or maybe sooner if you want).

    It will also be cheaper doing SD with BSAC than AOW + drysuit with PADI.
     
  18. VintageGt

    VintageGt Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2017
    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    10
    Yeah, great advice. I have looked into this and there are a few BSAC clubs dotted around my locale so will do some digging and maybe visit a couple and see where I feel I'll fit in and get a good service.

    By all accounts, and the more I read, an awful lot of people recommend this route. BSAC courses seem to be highly recommended.
     
  19. Tribal Chestnut

    Tribal Chestnut Active Member
    UKD Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2015
    Messages:
    479
    Likes Received:
    183
    Yeah, BSAC are the bestest ;)
     
  20. hawk

    hawk Doing It Rong
    UKD Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2012
    Messages:
    1,360
    Likes Received:
    482
    BSAC has pros and cons but if you can find an active club, (as a relative newbie) you will struggle to find a better way of getting wet on a regular basis IMO
     

Share This Page

  • About Us

    Our UKDivers community has been around for many years and prides itself on offering unbiased, helpful discussion among people of all disciplines and abilities. We are working every day to make sure our community is one of the best and friendliest around.
  • Support us!

    The management works very hard to make sure the community continues to run reliably. Care to support us? All donations go to the running costs of the forum: hosting charges, software maintenance, etc. We'd really appreciate it!

    Choose option:  

    UKD Username: