1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

New from South Yorkshire

Discussion in 'Member Introductions' started by reefer, Apr 23, 2017.

  1. reefer

    reefer Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2017
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    3
    Hi

    Complete novice to diving from the Rotherham area here.

    I've always had an interest in marine life and for a few years kept a marine aquarium with various hard corals etc
    Diving in a reef has always been on my bucket list, so hopefully I can get that crossed off once I have the necessary experience and skills. (photography needs to be in there!)

    Having read various threads on the forum, I've decided that I am going to do the PADI Open Water course. As it's a fair investment financially, I've booked onto a dry dive first - just to make sure I don't have some kind of problem with it!

    Interesting to hear from any local divers and what the club scene is like in the area ?


    Cheers
    Al
     
  2. splinter

    splinter Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    136
    Likes Received:
    51
    Hi reefer. Welcome.

    I live not far from you. I'm from Sheffield, living in Dronfield now.

    Who are you doing your try dive with?

    There are a few local clubs, both bsac and padi. The one I've had the most contact with is diveworld, who have shops at Hillsborough and SDS at Mosborough. Their training is to a high standard and they have a pretty active dive club.

    I also remember hearing about a club based at ponds forge. They're padi, but run more like the bsac model. You pay a joining fee and then courses are included in the price. I'll see if i can dig up their details.

    Once you have your OW, I'll happily dive with you, there's a couple of quarries not far away and if you fancy the sea, the farne islands are about 3 and a bit hours away. They're well worth visiting.

    Lots of helpful people on this forum, so any questions, ask away.



    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk
     
  3. JohnL

    JohnL Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2015
    Messages:
    799
    Likes Received:
    335
    Welcome Al, reefs will be well within your capabilities on OW, given suitably warm water. Photography might take a little longer as it loads your brain and things like buoyancy can become a problem.
     
  4. reefer

    reefer Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2017
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    3
    Hi

    I've signed up with Dream Divers for the try dive. I'm planning to use them to do the open water qualification assuming I don't hate the try dive. I've read a few posts talking about BSAC being more of a club environment, so perhaps thats something I should consider once qualified.

    I'd love to try a dive in the sea once I'm ready for it (not sure how long that typically takes!) :eek:)

    I've already borrowed an open water manual and downloaded the video to try and get a little head start.

    Cheers

    Al
     
  5. reefer

    reefer Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2017
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    3
    Thanks mate.

    There is so much to do isn't there!
     
  6. splinter

    splinter Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    136
    Likes Received:
    51
    Don't know much about dream divers. I'm sure you'll have a great time and be hooked once you get going.

    If not had a lot of luck with the bsac clubs nearby. I went to a pool night for one and they spent the night slagging PADI off, another was only a small club and didn't seem to run that many trips and a third never responded to any of my communications. I'm sure the are some decent ones, but i found it easier to find dive buddies on Facebook and forums.

    Good luck and let us know how you get on.

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk
     
  7. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
    UKD Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2014
    Messages:
    4,246
    Likes Received:
    940
    Has to be said; diving in the UK and diving and warm, clear water foreign diving is quite different! The main issue with UK diving is firstly the temperature, so drysuits are the norm. The other thing we have in the UK is a lot of tidal water, so the visibility can be variable.

    The up side is that we've loads of wrecks around our coasts with lots of interesting diving for all levels.

    So yesterday, I was diving on a wreck in the English Channel where there was good visibility - circa 10 metres - and absolutely loads of sea life from crustaceans through shoals of fish. The wreck was "nice" and had a very interesting stern where the propeller and rudder hang under the long stern. Most definitely one to revisit.

    UK diving's great as you simply don't know what you're going to see until you get down there.

    Diving does need some practice to get better at it, which is as true for UK as any diving. There's lots to learn and an amazing world down there to explore. It should come with a warning though: it's highly addictive! Have fun:)
     
  8. reefer

    reefer Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2017
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    3
    Diving as a whole is fascinating to me, however I can see that there are inherent risks - you don't have to look far on Google. ie I was reading through some of the BSAC Diving Incident reports. I don't want to become overly paranoid, but you can see how quickly it is possible to get yourself in trouble from reading other's experiences.
    Having said that, reading others experiences means we can all learn.

    I guess the best approach is to take my time with the training and study materials and be honest with my capabilities and keep on practising..

    Before I did a little reading into the subject, I assumed that because I was a fairly confident swimmer, I would be fine. It seems this will have very little bearing on things - ie being an okay swimmer does not mean I will be able to refit my mask and clear it under water with next to no visibility etc!
     
  9. JohnL

    JohnL Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2015
    Messages:
    799
    Likes Received:
    335
    Being able to swim does no harm and shows some kind of general fitness. The surprising thing to me was the amount of weight you have to lug around when you are not in the water - lead 12kg, cylinder 13kg, other bits 10kg and you are stomping around with 35kg. Once in the water, it weighs nothing if you have your buoyancy under control. I wouldn't have been able to start diving without already exercising regularly.
    When you start, you will find some things easy and others difficult - we hit different problems, but it's a lucky person who sails through. Mask clearing is a favourite issue. With a good teacher, most people who have started will complete the training. The forum can help - several of us mentored a lady who was panicking about mask clearing and we helped her get there.
    Your proposed approach is great - do the work, follow the rules and you will be fine. If you don't, it is easy to get into problems - saw a case recently, where someone on an OW course had partied well the night before, lost his regulator and couldn't find it (should be simple), didn't use his alternative regulator or the instructor's alternative (he was very close). Uncontrolled ascent from about 10m (i.e shallow), holding his breath and was helped into the boat coughing blood (likely some lung damage). After this, he was annoyed not to be allowed to dive again. Alcohol and diving are bad buddies.
     
  10. splinter

    splinter Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    136
    Likes Received:
    51
    You've got the right attitude by the sound of it. It's good to be aware of what can go wrong, but you're training is there to firstly prevent an incident and secondly how to deal with it if something does occur. It's meant to be fun (and it is, usually).

    Listen to your instructors, get some diving done with someone who can mentor you (ask on here) and don't try to go too far, too quickly. Increase your depth/dive duration a bit at a time. Practice your skills on every dive.

    You'll be a dive god before you know it!

    Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk
     
  11. jb2cool

    jb2cool Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2008
    Messages:
    2,813
    Likes Received:
    384
    This yourself lucky, last week I had double 18L cylinders and two side slung decompression cylinders, I was carrying around 70kg of kit. The twinset alone was around 45kg.
     
  12. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
    UKD Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2014
    Messages:
    4,246
    Likes Received:
    940
    Kit in the water's lovely. Climb on a dive lift and you go from weightless to you carcass+70kg in a couple of seconds. Heavy man!

    Then there's lugging the kit into mines and caves. You really know how much it weighs then!
     
  13. Vanny

    Vanny Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2016
    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    83
    You need a rebreather :whistling:
     
  14. Doomanic

    Doomanic Dinosaur Wrangler
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2009
    Messages:
    5,427
    Likes Received:
    1,928
    I may have mentioned that at the time... :D
     
    Vanny likes this.
  15. reefer

    reefer Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2017
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    3
    I ended up swapping my course provider due to issues I had with date changes.

    Anyway, I have successfully completed the Open Water certification this weekend with a new provider. Not sure how I feel about it yet.

    The open water dives were done in water with just about 1 metres visibility. The standard skills on the platform (mask removal, reg retrieval etc) were not an issue for me.

    What is really hard is navigating in such poor visibility. Soo much to think about - buoyancy, obstacles, keeping the lubber line central and keeping the North needle on the correct heading -all while you can't see a damn thing. No cheating for sure on visual ques!

    At one point I ended up in a slight tangle in some rope. I can see how something like this could escalate into a big problem for a student, if I'm honest - it was a little scary.

    Keep focused is what I told myself - I still had a reg in my gob and plenty of air, tried to focus on nice regular breathing. Stayed still and signalled the instructor there was a problem with legs.
    Of course the instructor untangled me and all was well.

    We repeated the exercise in another section of the water where such obstacles were not around.

    It turns out some guide ropes had been laid recently along the floor (to assist divers with the poor vis) - unknown to the instructor in the first area we did the nav exercise.

    I don't think any of this would have happened if visibility had been better.

    Overall, I'm really pleased I got through the day - but at the same time had a wake up call to potential dangers (I'm not implying I was in danger this time, as I had an instructor with me)
     
    JohnL likes this.
  16. Mako-JD

    Mako-JD Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2015
    Messages:
    351
    Likes Received:
    83
    Congrats on passing and welcome to to expensive part.

    Don't worry to much about poor visabilty and navigation problems. This is only overcome with time and practice.

    Honestly even after 2 years I can still fudge it in bad vis, to the amusement of my buddies :)
     
  17. JohnL

    JohnL Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2015
    Messages:
    799
    Likes Received:
    335
    Well done, Reefer. Having done most of my diving in warmer waters with anything below 10m vis regarded as poor, I'm uncomfortable with 3m, never tried 1m.:whistling: Your reaction to the tangle was excellent - you thought it through and were sorted out by your buddy (in this case, the instructor). Almost all recreational divers never dive alone - while you don't often need your buddy (and vice versa), it's a comfort to know that they are there and vital when you are dying for a pee and need your dry suit unzipped.:eek:
     
  18. reefer

    reefer Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2017
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    3
    Thanks..

    As I'm joining a local BSAC club, they have invited me along to a day trip to Capernwray for a pleasure dive.

    I'm actually quite looking forward to being able to see further than my hand!
     
  19. Vanny

    Vanny Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2016
    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    83
    Hope you've found a good club, sounds promising. Enjoy the diving , if it doesn't all feel natural now hold onto the "dream" of diving you had. You will get there , it's just one of those Hobbies that take time to get comfy with.
     

Share This Page

  • About Us

    Our UKDivers community has been around for many years and prides itself on offering unbiased, helpful discussion among people of all disciplines and abilities. We are working every day to make sure our community is one of the best and friendliest around.
  • Support us!

    The management works very hard to make sure the community continues to run reliably. Care to support us? All donations go to the running costs of the forum: hosting charges, software maintenance, etc. We'd really appreciate it!

    Choose option:  

    UKD Username: