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Long hose or not long hose

Discussion in 'Technical Diving' started by Iain Denham, Mar 10, 2016.

  1. furryman

    furryman hmmmm
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    And will continue to be said several more times, on several more threads, over the next several years...:whistling:
     
  2. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
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    I didnt miss, I dismissed, until the circumstances and state of the diver are quantified it's pointless
    discussing specifics.




    1. For reg recovery to work right there has to be weight to the second stage, In the past this was fine as
    regs were always heavier, but these days with lighter materials and holiday rigs less so, hence if you
    have these regs need to use lighter hoses such as Myflex etc.

    This is important, because recovery needs the reg to be away from the diver anywhere within an arc of
    about 60degrees from the horizontal (easier to show then describe), which means the diver has to rotate
    slightly so the regs own weight hangs down and puts it within this arc.

    Then it's a matter of putting the hand behind by literally rolling it against the side of your body (tight) until
    you grab the base of the cylinder. At this point you release and yes this is where the high sweep bit comes
    in.

    Good positioning ensures the reg is in the right place and that roll arond your body ensures no gaps for the
    hose to slide through, if done right it will now be on the arm and a slide up the arm will meet with the hose.

    This can though come up against the octopus if rigged right, which some may argue is an advantage, but
    I think is a fail and one reason I prefer to use octopus left.


    2. So what happens if it still goes pair shaped and you mess up?

    Well it's no big deal, because as divers we always have backups :) If it's octopus right it's still there to be
    used by self and feeds the right way up. If it's octopus left using it direct will mean that it's upside down.
    so instead you dip your head and loop it around the back of your head so it feeds right and now the
    mouthpiece is the correct way up. The additional length of the hose will put it in exactly the same position
    as the primary used to be so no problem.

    3. Yes i've messed up twice now so what now?
    When all this was going on were you static or at the same time making sure your buddy knew all about it :)


    I've left out a few bits for simplicity, but the above is as much a drilled routine as any long-hose effort with
    students become very adept at performing it.

    Takes longer to read that then it did to do the skill for real :)
     
  3. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
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    I feel almost churlish to bring up the longhose config here - and simultaneously answer Iain's original question...!

    With the longhose configuration, there is no equivalent recovery drill simply because the configuration does not suffer from that issue. The Longhose is effectively trapped between your right ear and right arm and the backup bungeed close to your throat.

    Donation to an incapacitated diver, e.g. OOG, is more controlled as the longhose user presents the regulator to the other diver's mouth. An octopus is sometimes taken (@furryman's starfish), or sometimes presented.

    A big benefit of the longhose is the option to use the full length of the hose to get some space between you, for instance if you're swimming through a restriction (in a wreck), or if you need space to do something such as put up an SMB. Of course this is an option; one can still hold the incapacitated diver close to control him/her, such as a Controlled Buoyant Lift (CBL) or just controlling them (e.g. if their buoyancy's shot away).

    It can be argued that the longhose config requires additional training. But then it can be argued that the octopus configuration also needs better training and practice.

    And finally, the longhose may not be suited for use with certain types of BCD. It can be used with some BCD designs, but it is best used with a wing and backplate with either single or twin cylinders.
     
  4. Nick Ward

    Nick Ward Active Member

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    And from a still-learning perspective, it's the hardest skill to learn - too much to try and coordinate together when there's what appears to be a much simpler solution... trying to do this without looking like a blind, uncoordinated octopus on acid is not at all easy...
     
  5. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
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    Sorry if you feel that way you've been taught wrong.

    Where abouts are you?

    Can run through this in one session and make it easy :)
     
  6. Nick Ward

    Nick Ward Active Member

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    Sunny Leicestershire-by-sea ;)

    I honestly don't think it's the quality of the teaching that's the problem... it's just a difficult skill <shrugs>
     
  7. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
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    Well I would have offered to change your mind with a free session, but that's a bit far.
     
  8. Nick Ward

    Nick Ward Active Member

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    Well, I appreciate the sentiment... may well have taken you up on the offer ;)

    Already suffering dive withdrawal symptoms, still got nearly 4 weeks till my next dive :s
     

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