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Kit storage

Discussion in 'General Scuba Diving' started by phantomlurker, Oct 9, 2017.

  1. phantomlurker

    phantomlurker Member

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    So as the nights are starting to draw in I started to think about how I'm going to store my kit in between dives over the winter months. Currently it all goes in the loft when dry, but Tbh getting it up and down the ladder is a bit of a ballache. My new plan is to put it in the garage (which is a mess at the moment, and not 100% secure hence the loft storage).

    The Mrs - who has some experience of working with gas cylinders outside raised the point that very low temperatures might cause some problems with kit, especially o rings and rubber seals etc. I think she just trying to preempt the "the cold broke my kit, I need new shiny stuff" argument :whistling: specifically I'm talking about cylinder, regs, wetsuit, torches.

    So I thought I'd ask the font of all diving knowledge what I should be doing. Options include:
    -Keep it all in the loft (please no, such a ballache...)
    -Store in garage with frost heater
    -Store in garage in an insulated garden store box
    -Store in garage except for more delicate items such as regs
    -Stop worrying and just put it all down there, it'll probably be fine...

    Please come forth with your ideas/suggestions/recommendations. All will be appreciated!
     
  2. Griffalo

    Griffalo Active Member

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    I store everything in the garage, never had an issue with frost in the garage but then again I’ll be diving at least once a month over the winter.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
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  3. splinter

    splinter Active Member

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    Mines also in the garage. I have a couple of gear gulper type boxes which I keep most of it in. Cylinders stand up next to them and drysuit in it's bag lives on top.

    Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk
     
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  4. Vanny

    Vanny Active Member

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    Garage is good unless you get mice. Use some sort of plastic storage crate with a lid. Suit seals , particularly latex suffer in the cold. I keep all our suits in doors away from mice and frost. Same for the rebreather.
     
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  5. phantomlurker

    phantomlurker Member

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    Thanks for the replies.

    I do have a couple of gear gulper-style boxes (once they've been emptied of wedding stuff :muted: ) that have been assigned to kit storage. I'm happy that they will keep most of the stuff fine, the mice will have to have pretty strong jaws to get through them...

    I do intend to keep diving over the winter, I have sport diver grade to achieve after all! Before that I need to get drysuit ticket/sign off. I'm thinking I'll keep the suits inside in line with the comment from @Vanny. Luckily I don't need to worry about a rebreather!

    On the plus-side, if any kit does suffer due to the cold I can then blame you kind folk, and then go buy shiny things :whistling:
     
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  6. Vanny

    Vanny Active Member

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    Oh another one is computer / torch batteries won't like the cold. If you've got normal batteries in a torch take them out. Computers are best in doors , otherwise it'll be dead when you get to diving.

    Slowly it becomes clear that you'll have kit scurried away in all sorts of hidey holes. If you haven't draw up a list of what you need to go diving. I've got a couple and then a "what I need to pack in the van list" that can extend to spare cylinders, tool box, camping kit etc.

    OCD me , never.
     
  7. phantomlurker

    phantomlurker Member

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    Ah now thats the kind of info I'm after, my computer battery change isn't a diy job, so that's key to kep indoors.

    Nothing wrong with OCD, far better than my somewhat casual approach. Good call on the list, time for me to construct one, including my usual storage places I think. Ta!
     
  8. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
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    The majority of my dive kit's stored in the garage, which is integral to the house and contains the boiler. Not warm, but doesn't freeze.

    The drysuit spends most of its life hanging from the ceiling on a Hangair hanger. If I were to store it in a bag for any time I'd bring it indoors.

    Diving kit is hung up to dry for a few days then put away into builder's trugs (round bins with handles) ready for the next adventure. Caps are screwed onto regulators to keep any damp out.

    Damp would be the enemy of dive kit. Covered bins would be better, maybe with damp-absorbing desiccant if it were a damp garage.

    One of the best things fitted to the garage was a roller-shutter door. Whilst not damp, the previous up and over door was cold and let the wind in. The plastic roller shutter provides some insulation and is fairly air-tight.
     
  9. Zubar

    Zubar Active Member
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    My dive shed is remote from the house, has a broken frost guard.

    For me mice are the main issue, they seem to love silicone rubber. So plastic crates for everything.
     
  10. Dave Whitlow

    Dave Whitlow Well-Known Member

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    My dive kit is the purpose of the garage. It is integral to the house and I added a roller-shutter door (with remote control ), a radiator, a dehumidifier and lots of storage for the important things in life. The 'magic drying room' will dry most kit overnight and has a useful amount of gas storage as well. If anyone can suggest an upgrade then I am open to ideas.
     
  11. hawk

    hawk Doing It Rong
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    A man to carry it all to the car :)
     
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  12. phantomlurker

    phantomlurker Member

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    :jawdrop: that is a good effort! Now that is what I dream of, however I'm not sure the finance director will go for it, not when there is a lot of house to renovate still. Although have had some useful advice about building an insulated cabinet from the LOVELY 1970s doors that still adorn the house (I knew there was a good reason not to have changed them yet...)
    Unfortunately the garage is not integral and is at the end of the garden. But it does need new doors, maybe a roller is the way to go from here!

    Thanks for the tips folks, all very useful :)
     
  13. Big Joe

    Big Joe Active Member

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    That should be a person to carry it to the car. I am all for equality and some of the birds I know are stronger than me,
     
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  14. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
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    How to make a quick and cheap kit store for in the garage :)

    Many 60-80's houses and even some modern ones have flat composite doors, which means upto
    a dozen turn up on ebay in one lot as the entire house gets changed for new. I've bought these for
    as low as I kid you not 50p each for 10. Best bit is they are same size usually 6'6" x 32" (they are
    nearly always imperial), Although the core is cardboard they have a softwood edge which can be
    screwed into, so ..................

    Screw one door onto the edge of two others and use the already cut hinges of another to make a
    door. You should end up with a shower type cubicle. Cut one in half and slap this on the top adding
    a batten to cover the exposed core. It can sit on a bit of plywood or can also use an old shower tray
    as a base. To make bigger just add two doors at the back and a double door at the front :)

    Most won';t need sealing, but can look a bit dark so hit with a wash of white undercoat first followed
    by a second decent coat. Can add rails shelves etc. and if it';s cold in the garage stick a couple of
    vents and get a basic oil fired greenhouse heater bar. These are cheap and work well to take the chill
    off :)

    I've used this material a lot to line sheds and the core adds extra insulation making it a very efficient and
    cheap material :)
     
  15. nickb

    nickb Active Member

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    Dave's 'finance director' is very sympathetic to his requirements, mostly 'cos it facilitates his long periods of absence from the house.

    To this end it was pretty much the first thing in the house to be renovated and, so far, remains the latest :D

    It's a fine dive store by the way, although the electrics could do with a slight upgrade.
     
  16. Dave Whitlow

    Dave Whitlow Well-Known Member

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    Her reasons are good and I wholly support being encouraged to go diving and forage for fresh food.
    why renovate a house when it doesn't need it that much? aren't they for living in?
    anyway, you forgot the shed. That came first, as I needed to accommodate the stuff I wasn't having in the garage whilst the garage was stripped, cleaned, insulated, painted and fitted with rubber matting.
    yes, that circuit-breaker does need an upgrade. I expect it will be done long before you next bring your power-hungry gas transport device this way.
     

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