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Drysuit maintenance

Discussion in 'Dry Suits' started by ScubaDanny, Oct 12, 2020.

  1. ScubaDanny

    ScubaDanny New Member

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    I recently received a new Otter Atlantic HD drysuit mtm (which is also my very first drysuit) and I had the chance to try it at Vobster quarry last week. It came with a maintenance guide :woot: but I was wandering what you guys do right after a dive when you get back home and what’s your long terms drysuit maintenance routine.

    grazie

    :geek:
     
  2. jb2cool

    jb2cool Moderator
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    They don’t need a whole lot.

    If it’s freshwater I just dry it out and then store it.

    If it’s salt water I rinse it in freshwater (this could be a quarry dive or in the bath) then dry it out and store it.

    if the zip is stiff give it a bit of lube. You can over wax a zip so don’t get carried away.

    Once dry talc the seals so it’s ready for next time.

    make sure the inside is dry (especially the boots) before you store it.
     
    BabyShark, Dave Whitlow and NickPicks like this.
  3. Dave Whitlow

    Dave Whitlow Super Moderator
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    if fresh water but the suit got muddy (memories of muddy car parks) then I'd rinse it too.

    My approach to rinsing is to drape it over step ladders in the garden, hose it, turning once. When the worse of the dripping is done I put it on a heavy suit hanger I suspend by the stairs (being a telescopic it is quite tall).
    Upside down also works and a broom handle helps extend the arms.

    It stays there for a while and I pat it occasionally to change the air inside. If I've no immediate plans it stays there for a few days (longer sometimes) and eventually goes back in the bag.
    Yep, that sounds fine. Talc seems to matter more with latex seals.

    If you have a p-valve then it should be rinsed through as a minimum. Disinfecting is a good idea.

    If you don't have a p-valve then get one! Years later you will look back and realise it was one of the best pieces of dive kit you ever bought!

    If your p-valve has a quick disconnect with a one-way valve then remove the quick-disconnect immediately, destroy it utterly (fire works), and replace with a simple QD which allows liquid left in the tube to drain. Better to live with a few drips each time than experience some of the alternative possibilities.

    Retained liquid held in a p-valve, and released when re-connecting, can be surprising and can lead to an acute fever lasting a number of days, a course of antibiotics, loss of 4kg, and ultimately replacement of a sodden sweat-soaked mattress! It is an easy mistake if your cleaning routine is disrupted. In my case an NDAC dive and staying away for a few days did the trick. The garage-dried suit didn't get any attention until the next dive. To avoid ever repeating that extreme experience I carry a 1.5l bottle of water to every dive, use it for mask rinsing, drink plenty, and after diving I flush water through the p-valve immediately after disconnecting.
     
  4. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
    UKD Supporter

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    I never rinse mine.

    I always make sure it's rolled up and bagged correctly in transport: ensure the zip's done up and the cover zip (if fitted) is also done up. This is important for zip longevity.

    I always rinse the pee valve with fresh water -- on the boat I'll disconnect and blow mouthfuls of water through to rinse and be blown out; repeat for half litre of water. Always disconnect the quick-connect valve to stop anything leaking back into the suit.

    When I get home I'll hang the suit up in the (integral) garage from the highish roof using a large drysuit hanger that includes a fan blowing in from the neck. The front opening zip is done up 3/4 of the way to leave a little air vent, but not to affect the suit's shape. The pee/convenience zip is undone and the pee valve hose pulled out and the one-way valve opened. Blow through to make sure there's no drips left inside. The fan's left on for a couple of hours to dry the inside of the suit. I leave it permanently hanging until it's next needed when it'll be packed away properly in the bag. Dry boots are hung up separately to dry until needed.

    Zips are regularly waxed. Probably every 3 trips, or if the zips start sticking. Generous use of beeswax. Works well.
     
  5. ScubaDanny

    ScubaDanny New Member

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    Thank you so much for all the info once again

    :geek:
     

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