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dry suit sizing.

Discussion in 'Dry Suits' started by sam51, Mar 21, 2017.

  1. sam51

    sam51 Member

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    hi all. if you have dry suit that is a bit to big, does this affect weighting, i have a tri laminate, i think its to big,
    and the boots as well. i seem to have too much air in it. the si tech auto dump valve i dont trust,
    had it not work a few times. i am on 12kg lead, and sink ok, but end of dive when i hit the 10 mtr mark, i really
    struggle to stay down, and not do a rapid assent , getting a bit pissed off with dry suit diving.
    in a wet suit im like a seaoned pro.
     
  2. Doomanic

    Doomanic Dinosaur Wrangler
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    First of all, have you done a weight check with 30bar in the cylinder? 12KG may well be enough at the start, but borderline at the end. If that's the case, you will have problems if you don't get all the gas out of the suit. An ill-fitting suit may make dumping the gas more difficult so you may have to resort to going vertical (shock, horror...) to get it all out
     
  3. Griffalo

    Griffalo Active Member

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    Where is your dump valve? If the suit is too baggy you'll end up with pockets of air in various places and it sounds like you're having problems dumping as you come up. The trick is to have your dump valve at the highest point and to ensure there is a route for the excess air in your suit to get to it.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  4. Iain Denham

    Iain Denham Active Member

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    Tri laminate suit is designed to be a "bit baggy" as you have to fit thermals under neath BUT if its not a good fit in can lead to lots of pockets of air that are hard to manage and migrate to your dump valve, leading to your described issues.

    However you do need to do a proper weight check as Doom describes and I would get an experienced diver to check your suit for fit, because once you have mastered a dry suit it is so much more superior to a wet suit.
     
  5. sam51

    sam51 Member

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    iain, i totally agree, i see no reason to enjoy any diving with a wetsuit, or drysuit. there are some differences
    but talking to various experiences divers, there seem to be conflicting interests. i.e. taught to use bcd at surface only
    others say use dry suit for squeeze, and bouyance, others say drysuit for squeeze, bcd for bouyance,my auto dump is shoulder,
    someone else said get it wrist mounted , as i said on previous post about padi, they teach you some basics then your on your own.
    confusing,
     
  6. Doomanic

    Doomanic Dinosaur Wrangler
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    You need to use what feels right and that comes with practice. I was taught suit for buoyancy by PADI and absolutely hated it. Luckily I met some much more experienced divers on this forum and they help me progress. Like you, I've never had the confidence that my autodump would shift gas as fast as I needed it to (in fact, my first dump was faulty) and I hate the feeling you get when the gas migrates to the legs. I feel much more comfortable using the wing (I haven't dived a BCD since I went onto twins at 34 dives).
     
  7. sam51

    sam51 Member

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    dom love my bcd, although it is rearly a wing come bcd. need to find some experiance divers for a bit of help.
     
  8. Griffalo

    Griffalo Active Member

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    At the risk of getting shot down in flames, a shoulder dump is what you want, far easier to dump when in horizontal trim. Most people I know use the BCD (wing or otherwise) for buoyancy just adding air to the suit to relieve squeeze or for extra warmth even though most were taught to use the suit for buoyancy originally.


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    Marie likes this.
  9. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
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    Sounds like it's too big, but before we dismiss what you have let's try a different
    tack.

    If your suit is too big then it will allow air migration and yes boots too big the same
    problem, so do what you can (for now) to eliminate the problem.

    I don't like Sitec valves. I've had a lot of Apeks and Sitec, but the Sitec have
    failed almost as much as a Mk1 Apeks, so if not happy then maybe worth buying
    an Apeks Mk2 (pictured) and just swapping over so you'll have confidence in it working.
    [​IMG]

    Now wear loads of socks, maybe a pair of thinsulate socks to fill the void a bit.
    The purists will hate this, but for now see if you can borrow (or buy they are pretty
    cheap) a set of ankle weights.

    Next assuming you have a decent set of base layers undo valve, pull neck seal and
    squat down, go feotal position squashing arms against chest and getting as much air
    out as possible. Take hand out of neck close valve and stand up. Once you jump in
    and before the dive fully open valve. Now use the BC for buoyancy and the suit for
    squeeze and warmth only, really try and keep away from the drysuit inflate.

    Now do a decent buoyancy check, got that just right? Ok now do a trim check and if
    neccessary get out and reconfigure the weight. This might mean moving the cylinder
    up or putting a bit less on the belt moving the weight on the belt to the front and/or
    adding a couple of 1kg in the pocket or even threaded onto the BC waistband if it will
    allow. If you have trim weight pockets use them :)

    Once you've done all this get in and try it again and give it a good bit of faff time before
    even thinking about the dive itself.

    The above will often sort a bit bigger drysuit, but it's not great if the drysuit is way too
    big, so if after all the above it's not improved even a bit then i'd say time to change it.
     
    JohnL likes this.
  10. sam51

    sam51 Member

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    thanks tel, done most of that, might try a new valve, dont know to try a wrist dump.
    with 12 kg in the sea, i seem to sink like a brick. its the end of dive at the 10 mtr mark,
    i struggle to stay down, in a wet suit I'm like a pro, in a drysuit feel like a right numpty.
     
  11. JohnL

    JohnL Well-Known Member

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    Sam51, having done most of my diving in a wetsuit, I'm starting in a drysuit and I'm in the same place. I fondly hope that practice will make it easier, if not perfect.:facepalm:
     
  12. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
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    Again the purists will hate this as a solution, but it works so who gives a shit :)

    There are many reasons for being horizontal on the ascent in diving, but hardly
    any apply to rec or limited deco diving. So on the dive be horizontal sure, but
    don't feel obliged to do the same on the ascent.

    If vertical any trapped air added on the dive will migrate to the highest point and
    a slight shoulder rotation will also put the dump at the highest, making sure it
    vents and the best bit is this can be visibly so.

    If you are weighted right for the end of the dive (don't forget the weight of the gas
    you've used) then all that's left is trapped air and to get rid of that need to make
    sure any expanding air pockets can be drained.

    For a test next time you go out preferably on an inland site with no tides etc. do
    an ascent on a shot line and gauge at what point it feels like it's getting away from
    you. Then wrap your legs around the shot and rotate your shoulder to get the
    dump at its highest and see if you can get anymore out.

    Make sure your buddy is fully aware what you are doing and is alongside watching.

    This is a bit like repairing a washing machine :)
    Bloody easy to fix, but can be hard to figure out what's wrong.
     
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  13. sam51

    sam51 Member

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    thanks for all the advice, and tel in particular, heres the case, after showing 2 experienced divers with my suit on,
    and a couple of adjustments , i feel happy with the suit, except the boots, 2 sizes too big,and seals,
    so have taken it back to manufacturer and am having boots changed to fit, and new silacone seals,
    wrist seals will be si tech dryglove system, hope this gets mt mojo back.
     
  14. JohnL

    JohnL Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like a good plan - on courses I used a borrowed suit with boots too large and it was very uncomfortable with the fear that I was at risk of becoming inverted if I ever had my feed above my body. My own suit has well-fitting boots and, while I'm still a total beginner, that fear has gone.
     
  15. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
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    I hope the SiTech drygloves works OK. I know how much @clique regrets having them fitted, and how much most Kubi owners like theirs.
     
  16. Griffalo

    Griffalo Active Member

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    If you still have a choice on dry gloves, go for Kubi. If it has to be SiTech try to avoid the Antares ones unless you have small hands.
     
  17. clique

    clique Active Member

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    Red rag to a bull but I'll bite.

    They're shit.

    As a replaceable wrist seal system the SiTech cuffs work great, I'm confident that I'm able to replace a bust seal without missing a dive. But the antares system for drygloves is complete wank. The gloves have two tangs which protrude which are quite fragile (I've broken two kitting up). As well as they rarely seal, irrespective of how careful you are trying to listen out for the two clicks as the tangs engage, they'd leak (significantly) 1 in 4 dives.

    I've had a fair bit of practice doing the 'SiTech Drill' - where you remove the dryglove, pull out the equalisation tube and replace the glove the best you can whilst at the bottom of the shotline. Yep, water gets into the drysuit but this is the lesser of two evils!

    I've gone back to wetgloves and will have them cut off my suit towards the tail end of the dive season and replaced with Kubi's.

    Not that I'm biased at all..
     
  18. sam51

    sam51 Member

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    so if i have silacone wrist seals, can i put any dry glove system on it,
    thanks sam.
     
  19. Doomanic

    Doomanic Dinosaur Wrangler
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    You can't have silicone wrist seals without a dryglove system.

    I have the Si Tech Glove Lock QCP which is the older, round system and it's usually dry. It's very bulky though, and the rings are so intrusive it's just not worth trying to use wet gloves.
     
  20. sam51

    sam51 Member

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    been told that i can use silacone wrist seals with or without dry gloves. i don't like gloves or hoods
    but if water temp is 15 degrees and above I'm quite happy to not to use either.
    but the option is there if needed.
     

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