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dry gloves

Discussion in 'Dry Suits' started by divebuddy323, Dec 26, 2010.

  1. divebuddy323

    divebuddy323 Member

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    hey

    jus out of curiosity with the dry gloves when you put them
    on to the suit can you take them off again? or are they permanatly on the suit, and the only way to get them off would be new seals?

    how easy are they to fit? do you like have to have them speically put on?

    not that familier with them but they look pritty cool :p

    li
     
  2. Air-Guzzler

    Air-Guzzler Cannot spel and I cannut delet your post :-)

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    I've used the Northern Divers type for about 2 years now the ring is slightly larger then other makes.
    they came be removed form your suit.
    if you use neoprene seals it takes 24hrs to fit them as you have to wait for the sealant to cure
    Latex take about 5 mins

    http://www.ndiver.com/site/nd_viewer_site/dryglove.html
     
  3. Silty Bottom

    Silty Bottom in DIRnial

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    Same goes for the KWTT drygloves from Seaskin. Fitted and removed in about 5mins to latex seals
     
  4. Jenkins

    Jenkins Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.

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    You can also get dry gloives with a latex seal (like on your drysuit wrist), which don't need fitting to your suit at all.
    - downside is that because they are a totally independant air cell to your suit it is impossible to add air at depth so once you get past 30m your hands get shrinkwrapped :thumbdown:
    - positive is that even if your glove leaks your suit is totally independant so doesn't also flood with water :thumbup:

    Personally I use neoprene gloves (6mm lobsters in the depths of winter) as whilst not as warm as dry dry gloves I have never had them "fail", leaving me with cold wet hands or having to abort a dive with a flooded suit :D
     
  5. Silty Bottom

    Silty Bottom in DIRnial

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    The KWTT and ND gloves leave your wrist seal in place, so if your glove leaks the worst you'll get is a slight trickle where you put bungee or tubing for equalising. But if you end up with a catastrophic flood (ripped glove as opposed to a pinhole) then it's just a case of whipping off the glove and removing the bungee/tubing, you're hands are going to be cold and wet anyway ;)
     
  6. rick stevens

    rick stevens Member

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    Ive just ordered some of the seaskin independant gloves, I've heard rumours that you can help with the squeeze problems by running a small tube under your drysuit wrist seal and under the glove seal.

    Does anyone do this and does it work?

    Rick
     
  7. Silty Bottom

    Silty Bottom in DIRnial

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    Thin/narrow latex/surgical tubing or a short length of bungee will allow just enough air to migrate to the gloves to allow equalising


    edit: are these the drygloves with plastic rings or semi-drygloves with a latex wrist seal?
     
  8. rick stevens

    rick stevens Member

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    Cheers for that Silty
    They are the lined drygloves with the latex wrist seals

    http://www.seaskin.co.uk/acatalog/Hoods_and_Gloves.html
     
  9. Silty Bottom

    Silty Bottom in DIRnial

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    Right then, in that case I haven't got a clue :D

    Never used them so I wouldn't know if they'll seal properly with bungee or tubing.

    I know a few people who've used another manufacturers neoprene versions who said they still got wet hands. Might have been leaking through the stitching of the glove which wouldn't be an issue with the gloves you've ordered though.

    So... no help at all then :D
     
  10. rick stevens

    rick stevens Member

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    Thanks anyway fella.

    From the info I've read, it looks like the latex seal of the glove sits on top of the wrist seal of the drysuit, in which case, if i run some tubing under my drysuit wrist seal (sticking out of it toward my hand) and then put the dryglove seal over that wristseal then shouldnt the other end of the tubing be inside the glove? and shouldnt the seals have sealed against each other to stop any water? oh my head hurts :confused: back to the pub then :D
     
  11. Silty Bottom

    Silty Bottom in DIRnial

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    Just my 2p

    I would've thought the cold water against the 2 latex seals would still allow you to get cold

    My theory, using drygloves, cold water is kept away from your wrists where the blood passes very close to the surface and therefore takes cooled blood to the rest of the body lowering your core temperature

    Probably a load of lobbox but I know I've stayed a lot warmer since using drygloves :D
     
  12. Flyingspanner

    Flyingspanner Well-Known Member

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    I have the Northern Diver version of these gloves.
    They're a bugger to get on.
    Tried putting the wrist seal over my suit seal, It leaked, badly.
    If you go much below 15m you have 2 useless claws where your hands used to be.
     
  13. rick stevens

    rick stevens Member

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    oh bugger! :crying:
     
  14. Major Clanger

    Major Clanger P-Plated Meg Diver

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    ND dry gloves are the dog's doodahs. Don/doffing an OPH is a pain but down to 36 the gloves are fine (not used them deeper yet). If necessary use a tube to avoid squeeze, like the ladies :lol: As Silty says, cold hands affect the rest of your diving. Since using ND dry's, warmth hasn't been an issue.
     
  15. Gnomey

    Gnomey Well-Known Member

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    It depends what design of dry glove you are looking at. There are the ones that have what looks like a drysuit seal. They just seal like your drysuit does. Then you have the gloves that seal to the drusuit with a ring system. They have no tight seal on the glove like your drysuit but instead have a ring fitted to the arm of the drysuit and the gloves seal to that and if you use the small tube under the drysuit seal into the glove, then the glove will equalise to the same pressure at the suit.
    I have been doing alot of research into this topic for myself over the last few weeks.
     
  16. neilh

    neilh Well-Known Member

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    There are various types, some you fix a ring onto the suit, some you can fit to existing latex seals, some fit into special fittings on the end of the suit and you can swap with seals and some are just gloves with latex seals that you don't connect to the suit at all.

    I use the RoLock system now which fit pretty quickly onto existing latex seals on the suit. They are a bit of a faff but once you've done it a few times they're not so bad. You need to pull the sleeve inside out though, so they won't work if the wrist end of your suit is too narrow.

    I've also used the gloves with latex seals and still have a pair as a backup :)

    That's true of any glove system that leaves the seal intact though. What you need to do is run some bungee (a decent length not a short length ;) ) beneath the wrist seal so that the air can migrate.

    I prefer bungee myself as any leak in the glove will only have the bungee as a route into my suit rather than an open tube. The water will then wick into your suit so you shouldn't get too wet.

    I had a small hole in one glove yesterday that leaked water in through the entire 40 minute dive. At the end I took my glove off and squeezed my hand with the underglove and rang out loads of water. I took my arm out of my suit and the sleeve of my undersuit was slightly damp. Glove fixed and nice and dry for dive 2 :)

    I also prefer a longer length of bungee. I find the bungee can move slightly during the dive and have had it pop out both into the glove and into the suit - leaving you with hands getting squeezed at depth and turning into balloons on ascent!

    Another option if you have longer under gloves is to put those on first then put your suit on. Your wrist seals then sit on top of those gloves and that also provides an air path so you don't need bungee. This can be a good idea with longer gloves as they can (and do!) get snagged in the rings or seals and the gloves leak.

    Yup! Bungee under wrist seal then under glove then dry glove. The absolute key is that your wrist seal is flat and the glove seal is lying flat on top. If they don't then they'll leak.

    They are a bit tricky to put on, but again once you've got the knack they are pretty easy.
     
  17. Jenkins

    Jenkins Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.

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    That is the type that Wrekrab has and yes sitting the glove seal over the wetsuit seal leaves you watertight and lets you use bungee/similar to equalise the gloves. Downside is that he needs someone to sit the seals flat for him, so whilst he has toasty hands I get freezing cold fingers whilst gloving him up :angry: also not an option on boats where faff tends to leave me feeling seasick :crying:

    Now he douses the seals with talc and simply plunges his hands into the glove, which leaves the seal sitting inside out. Watertight and easy to get on (so long as your hands are dry) unaided, big downside though is that the glove is totally independant from your suit so you can't add anything to reduce suit squeeze - he says they are OK down to the bottom of Stoney, but wouldn't want to use them past 40m.
    Oh and this method works OK with both latex and neo wrist seals Thumbs Up
     
  18. neilh

    neilh Well-Known Member

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    He just needs to learn how to put them on properly :)

    I can't picture this - what's stopping him using a length of bungee beneath the wrist seal? Providing it's long enough that it sticks out from under the glove seal as well then it'll still work.
     
  19. Jenkins

    Jenkins Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.

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    The glove is sealing directlyonto his wrist (not his suit)!!!
     
  20. rick stevens

    rick stevens Member

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    Forgive me for being thick here. Bungee? Are we talking about the elastic rope bungee? How does that help equalise the gloves and suit? Is it simply because it breaks the seal on the wrist?
     

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