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DMSB setups.

Discussion in 'Dive Equipment' started by Graysyid, Oct 1, 2018.

  1. Graysyid

    Graysyid Member

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    Just wondering how everyone sets up their DMSBs. It was noticeable that a few of us struggled on my last dive weekend. I've got an OMS DMSB and finger spool. Should the DMSB be attached directly to the line or using a D bolt? Should the spool be connected to the DMSB in your pocket or connect once you need to use it.

    I had a practice at Stoney and deployed near the stanegarth and swam with it but had a mare, dropped the spool and got tangled near surface. Seen various set ups on you tube, so was curious to see what you all use?
     
  2. Vanny

    Vanny Active Member

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    If it’s your main DSMB then I’d carry it attached , directly to the line by a loop, sure you’ll see that on you tube etc.

    Whilst I predict others will disagree I personally don’t believe a spool is correct for uk sea diving, if that’s where your planning to go. A decent reel and good sized DSMB are required. A spool and pocket DSMB make a great back up.

    Ultimately which ever system you go with practice, like it sounds your doing , makes perfect.
     
  3. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
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    Same as Vanny I carry a reel/DSMB attached and ready to go. I've never seen the sense in a spool
    for UK diving other than an OMG backup that takes up little room.

    Either you are definitely going to use it or you will use it when the brown stuff hits, either way
    why hide it away or have to assemble. One lump, unclip, unravel, inflate :)
     
  4. Dave Whitlow

    Dave Whitlow Well-Known Member

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    Another voice of agreement that a spool is not the right answer for sea diving, although for quarries anything goes.

    A decent ratchet reel already connected to the SMB is the most suitable combination.

    AP SMBi or CO2 SMB offer the simplest SMB deployment options and the choice of reel is largely down to length of line needed and reference.
     
  5. timmyg

    timmyg Super Moderator
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    I switched from a reel to a spool 4 years ago and do not find the need for a reel.

    I also disagree with the argument that a spool should be for a backup only, as your backup should be similar to your primary so in an emergency you can use it hassle free. Unfortunately for a lot of people their spare (DSMB, mask etc...) is the one they don’t like using hence it’s their spare!

    But hey, there’s no diving police so I’m not going to go tit for tat & say anyone is wrong. For me, I’ve not found the need for a reel. Just dive safe & most of all enjoy it.

    Re your question, the spool/reel should be attached to the DSMB directly with a loop, and even better with a small loop (or woody) to aid getting it on and off should you need to.

    Unfortunately I can’t post pics as I’m on a military exercise but I’m sure I have something on my laptop later if required. Happy to chat more if you need.


    TG

    Sent from my iPhone using timmytalk
     
    Graysyid likes this.
  6. nickb

    nickb Active Member

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    Without saying what kind of diving you do yourself, this statement is of little use.

    I dive wrecks from boats that almost invariably work the site 'live' around the perimeter of the wreck. They want divers to either come up a shotline or inform the surface of their position with an SMB. They will be looking for divers in the area of the wreck.

    Winding a spool in for more than 20m or so is a monumental pain in the arse so, unless the top of the wreck is shallower than that or the visibility is so good that you can still see the wreck when you bag-off, you could well send the bag up under the boat or in a blind spot from which the wind/tide could carry you out of sight quickly. For anyone that thinks this is far-fetched, I've seen exactly this scenario recently.

    An SMB attached to a small spool is a useful backup item stashed in a pocket (provided one can use it correctly) and I always have at least one. But my weapon of choice is a ratchet reel with enough line to reach the surface from the bottom. This will have a CO2 SMB attached to it in the manner that TimmyG has mentioned above. I also carry at least one spare CO2 cartridge in my drysuit pocket, just in case.

    A decent ratchet reel will rarely fail or 'birdsnest'. I have spent a lot of time crewing dive boats and the majority of ascent fuck-ups I've seen stem from poorly-deployed SMBs, most of which involved a spool.
     
  7. Dave Whitlow

    Dave Whitlow Well-Known Member

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    I tried a spool and concluded it offered few tangible benefits (smaller) but requires more effort and concentration. I am lazy so I have a reel and a backup reel in my pocket.

    Suitability depends on the diving done and the requirements of those dives.

    I find a spool unsuitable for attachment of my scallop bag before the bag is full enough to warrant a lift bag. My reel has a useful clip for this.

    For much of my diving the skipper wants to see an SMB from each diver before they leave the wreck as this allows them to pull the shot and track the divers more easily.
    Sending the blob from a shallower stop might be a few minutes later.

    I also find a reel also offers a handy place to clip things during the ascent.

    I agree. The backup should be as good as the primary, and ideally of the same type.
     
  8. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
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    I normally carry two large Halcyon SMBs attached to spools in my pockets. Generally use 45 metre spools; quite like the Apeks spools TBH although they're sodding expensive (bought two for a bargain price at last year's dive show).

    I have a long reel and crack-bottle SMB which I hate using as it's too big, cumbersome and ridiculously heavy. I also hate the faff of removing the two bungees (needed to keep it all together as it won't fit in a pocket). Probably more 'practice' would make it easier.

    If I'm doing a deeper dive, say 60m, I'll get the SMB and spool out of my pocket en-route up and release it from 40 metres. I use my suit inflate hose to inflate it. If diving with a suit inflate bottle, I tend to gaff tape the LH suit inflate hose to the SPG hose. Nothing too great, just to keep them together. Thus I can use the 'spare' suit inflate hose fed from back-gas for the SMB inflation.

    If diving less than 45 metres, I tend to set the blob off from the bottom and start my ascent as it's ascending. Rarely see the end of the spool.

    I find spools to be much more reliable than a reel. They're also a lot more simple.

    When at my stop I'll clip a double-ender to the line, twist it a couple or three times so the string can't escape, then clip it on the spool. I'll drop the spool down about a metre below me and make a ring with my thumb and fingers around the line. If it's lumpy, I might leave it a couple of metres below.

    The benefit of the Apeks spools is they're not completely full of line, so you can easily clip off at the end whilst waiting for the boat.


    Other people on here have alternative views about this. I'm very happy with the way I do mine as I'm sure they're very happy with the way they do theirs.
     
  9. NickPicks

    NickPicks Active Member

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    I have a McMahon 50m reel permanently attached to a buddy dSMB. This is compact enough to fit in my drysuit pocket.

    I also have a 50m spool permanently attached to a CO2 dSMB in my other pocket. I consider this as the backup because it's simple and quick to launch.

    I'm thinking of replacing the buddy dsmb with another CO2 one, and I'd like a KT reel too (maybe for Christmas!)
     
  10. Nick Ward

    Nick Ward Active Member

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    I use both spool and reel - practice with both and decide which you’re more comfortable with

    Either way, make sure there a swivel between the line and the dumb.... it’ll twist like buggery when you deploy, you don’t want the line twisting as well ;)
     
  11. nickb

    nickb Active Member

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    Why will it twist?
     
  12. Nick Ward

    Nick Ward Active Member

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    They always do.... watch it when it when it deploys, every one I’ve ever seen does
     
  13. nickb

    nickb Active Member

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    If the line has been wound on to the spool correctly there's no reason for it to twist when it's deployed.

    Of course, most spools have the line wound on with a twist 'cos the majority of them get wound whilst on deck after a birds nest during a fucked-up ascent.
     
  14. nickb

    nickb Active Member

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    If lines on a correctly-wound reel twisted when deployed, sewing machines wouldn't work
     
  15. Dave Whitlow

    Dave Whitlow Well-Known Member

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    My line never twists when I wind in onto my reel. Maybe another reason that a reel is a simpler option?
     
  16. Nick Ward

    Nick Ward Active Member

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    No - I’m talking about the dsmb... when they deploy they have a tendency to corkscrew... that can twist the line
     
  17. Dave Whitlow

    Dave Whitlow Well-Known Member

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    I have deployed quite a lot of SMBs from a variety of depths and I have never noticed this happen. If my line has become twisted then I must assume it untwists on subsequent dives as I don't unwind it from the reel to find out. Maybe this is one of those phenomenon which is there if you search for and which is not actually an issue?

    A more apparent problem I have seen is buddies who maintain a gradual fin movement on stops which results in a continuous movement towards me, with the eventual likely outcome of lines becoming crossed. This was useful driver in improvement of my back-finning.
     
  18. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
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    Obviously a spool will impart a twist in the line for each "wind". As it's deployed by unspooling, which doesn't twist the line, then wound in which does impart one twist per turn as you're winding in, the string will twist.

    I've never really noticed this to be a problem in reality, and if it is, then pulling some line out and re-winding sorts out any issues. Or just sit there on your stop turning the spool around. Something to do when bored at 6m.

    I still prefer the simplicity of a spool than a bloody great reel.
     
  19. Dave Whitlow

    Dave Whitlow Well-Known Member

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    Hmm, that sounds like a technique issue. I was under the impression the double-ended remains stationary whilst the spool moves. Done that way there would be no twist.
    Yep, and some folk prefer manual gears whilst some prefer automatic. What works for you is fine for you.

    It is when things become more busy that the difference becomes apparent. CCR bailout is quite busy (three bags of expanding gas and one with a CCR adding gas during the ascent) and there was a recent incident where a CCR diver bailed out and did a rapid ascent. Whilst lack of practice was clearly a factor, the last straw which led to the lost of fabulousness was not having a reel he could release whilst correcting a buoyancy issue. He has since acquired a bloody great reel with a ratchet with which he will visit quarries when he gets back in the water.
     
  20. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
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    I'll not doubt for a second that a bailout is, errm, stressful. Not least the cause, but all the expanding bags.

    My main issue with a reel was when I was a bit light at the end of a dive (what's that Skippy...? do a weight check before getting in...?). It was a bastard as I pulled the (heavy) reel and crack-bottle SMB forward and discovered I was relying on that ~2kg to keep me down. After the bag ascended, with me following closely behind furiously dumping and vertical too... Eventually did my mercifully short 12 mins of deco shrunk-wrapped and under the reel with my arm in the air.

    Learned a lot from that!

    Spools are lightweight and don't affect your weighting when used or moved.
     
    #20 Wibble, Oct 3, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2018

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