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Diving Crushed My Spine

Discussion in 'General Scuba Diving' started by pitdiver, Aug 1, 2018.

  1. pitdiver

    pitdiver Active Member

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  2. jb2cool

    jb2cool Moderator
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    I saw that over on The Dive Forum and there is little sympathy for him over there, I myself am inclined to agree.
     
  3. Tribal Chestnut

    Tribal Chestnut Well-Known Member
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    I feel sorry for the chap - it’s an awful thing to happen to anyone, but he appears to have made some truly ridiculous mistakes.
     
  4. Doomanic

    Doomanic Dinosaur Wrangler
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    They. They made some truly ridiculous mistakes. 4 instructors. The people we trust to keep us safe when we don't know any better apparently don't know any better.
     
  5. furryman

    furryman hmmmm
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    Tragic for him, but I fundamentally disagree with the journalistic words: "They now know that what happened was "a disparity between what was planned in terms of breathing rates and what actually happened on the dive". It was unpredictable."

    They simply failed to monitor their gas! Surely that is unforgiveable for "four experienced scuba diving instructors".
     
    JohnL likes this.
  6. Tribal Chestnut

    Tribal Chestnut Well-Known Member
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    It’s not even not monitoring it which is daft; for four ‘experienced’ divers to not have a rough idea as to what their RMV rates are is a joke.
     
  7. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
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    First thought was "what a load of bolocks". 40 metre's not deep unless you're only open water qualified. It's even within PADI RDP limits.

    Diving's fundamentally dangerous -- you can't breathe water. You train, practice and use appropriate kit to mitigate the risks. They didn't nor did they have the right approach so faced the inevitable consequences. They should consider themselves lucky to live to tell the tale.

    Instructors... hmm... I suppose they've taught us all the lesson that you shouldn't be cocks.

    A good silly season story though.
     
    joe90 likes this.
  8. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
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    It's been everywhere, fora, FB the lot and some have even complained to the BBC and had replies from the writer.

    Trouble is it's not so much the running out of air bit, but the clear denial from self-professed "experienced Instructor(s)"
    that such an event was planned for, when clearly it was not.

    Ok we don't know all the circumstances, but then we do know enough of what's meant to happen..
    A dive with a four usually acts as:
    1. Two buddy pairs,
    2. A leader with 3 in tow (usually the leader will also buddy with one)
    3. A dive team of 4 .

    So first off in any of the above and ignoring any redundant systems or extra gas carried for buddy, at the
    very least dive 101 is that all divers should have a enough reserve to get themselves to the surface for
    the planned dive including deco. In the event of a complete loss for two divers, worse case the other two
    could donate ALL their reserve and still all be ok.

    The above though also relies on decent gas monitoring by all parties and identifying who hits a mandatory
    "least gas" limit first to call or curtail the dive. If nobody was monitoring gas then it could be as likely that
    while two divers initiated the OOG call, the other two might well be not far behind.

    So taking all the above and his response into account, what fits into the above is not an altogether uncommon
    occurrence - the Invincibility concept. It's a phase with just enough experience to gain confidence, gain a solo
    mentality and feel Invincible - you actually believe the hype !!! . Put a group of these divers together and
    chances are gas monitoring and planning is left upto each individual on the assumption (in the group) that
    each know what they are doing, so why bother? .

    Genuinely experienced divers either move through this phase quickly or don't encounter it at all and it's these
    that will be planning dives weeks before, asking and getting gas updates on the dive of the whole team and
    be ready in a fubar with loads of gas.

    I'm sad for the guy sure as he's paid the price, but the moral of this incident of what you can achieve despite
    this life-changing injury has been tarnished by ignoring the moral that IF you plan and execute the dive properly
    this would not have happened and admitting that publicity could quite possibly have the potential to help
    others from making the same mistake.
     
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  9. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
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    The following statements don't add up:
    This implies a short, bounce, dive to 40 metres. The injuries indicate a much longer or deeper dive. Or they were fizzing from a previous dive?

    Use of "underwater slates"... when OOG?!?

    That article doesn't make sense. At least nobody died.
     
  10. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
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    Cam't find the link now, but this was a private dive after they'd been working all week, so good chance
    of some residual Nitrogen and being generally tired.
     

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