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DIR in the UK

Discussion in 'DIR Diving' started by MikeyH, Nov 14, 2015.

  1. jb2cool

    jb2cool Moderator
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    I'll check what we've got on. Might be fully booked till X as now.

    Mikey,
    The first GUE course that most people do is Fundamentals, this is a course for already qualified divers and it builds on the core skills like buoyancy and trim with some other skills/procedures thrown in as well (Rec1 is for brand new people that can't dive yet, think of it like PADI OW, AOW, Rescue and Nitrox all in one). It does not change the depth that you can dive to but it will give you a nitrox certification. Findamentals is all about improving your diving skills, whether that's to take the next step into technical diving/cave diving or just to make you a better diver doing the dives you are currently doing. There is PLENTY of value in doing a course like Fundamentals even if you are diving a single.
     
  2. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
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    Well done. Fundies passes definitely don't come out of cornflake packets!

    It definitely helps to have your buoyancy under control before you do the Fundies. You get so much out of Fundies.
     
  3. hawk

    hawk Doing It Rong
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    Garf - I'm genuinely not trying to bait you on this. If I was I'd be targeting the stuff that I think is stupid - like smoking and rechargeable batteries :)

    I am genuinely interested (and would love to have a beer / coffee with you to discuss) and I like the GUE ethos. And I genuinely intend to do a GUE experience day (if you'll have me).

    But where I think you and I differ is on the differentiation between standardised and the same.

    GUE mandate that everyone has the same OPH (without breaks or harpa type thingies), same length hoses, must use spools, must orally inflate blobs etc.

    When I dive with other teams (be they SM or BM), we may not have the SAME kit but we are all standardised in so much as we all have blobs (some have spools, some reels, some even have co2 blobs!!!!), we are all able to donate a long hose, we all have harnesses and bladders, we have planned and decided what gas we need and ALL use it. We all look out for each other. We all consider the safety of ourselves and our team as being paramount. We all do the same Sdrills. And so on.

    That to me is diving right, diving safely or whatever you want to call it. Perhaps not to the GUE standards of DIR but DIR all the same?
     
  4. Gareth Burrows

    Gareth Burrows Super Moderator
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    It's not a GUE standard. DIR is pretty well defined. Read the link I put in the last post and you'll understand why you might be diving safely, you might be diving right. But you're not diving DIR.
     
  5. Gareth Burrows

    Gareth Burrows Super Moderator
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    Just for a laugh tell me what's stupid about the DIR stance on rechargeable batteries. To make it easy for you, I'll give the logic behind the stance.

    The stance for primary light is that they should be rechargeable
    The stance for backup lights is that they should be non-rechargable.

    Batteries should be volt checked by DIR divers before they are put into a torch.

    Rechargeable batteries have a fast drop off curve. So they maintain a decent power output but when they start to run down run down very quickly and fail, whereas non rechargeable batteries tend to have a shallower drop off rate. In addition, the point where the power starts to drop off is predictable for non rechargeable batteries, but for rechargeable batteries is much less so as it depends on how many cycles they have been through, how good a charge they have taken, temperature etc. This makes it very difficult to predict how and when rechargeable batteries will fail with any accuracy, even when volt checking them.

    why does this matter?

    Think about when you are using a backup torch. You are in a cave or wreck and your primary light has failed. You are using your backup. You need a torch powered by a battery that has a known and predictable power curve, and one with a power curve that will drop off slowly rather than fail suddenly. You need to know how long that torch will last. Your life depends on it. Hence non rechargeable for backups.

    On the flip side if your primary light fails suddenly well so what. You have backups for this reason. Having the primary as rechargeable means you can afford to put much more powerful batteries into the primary without worrying about having to replace them each time.

    this is being a DIR diver. Every element of your diving plan, gas choices and equipment configuration is understood and selected whilst keeping in mind the whole picture - hence a holistic approach to diving.

    Now, do tell me why this is stupid...
     
    #25 Gareth Burrows, Nov 18, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2015
  6. hawk

    hawk Doing It Rong
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    I have read it and I can't find anything which suggests that we all need to have the SAME configuration or indeed back mounted manifolded cylinders to be diving DIR. Being generous, I will accept that there is reference to breathing a primary which does suggest a twinset but other than that ......

    The following is a direct copy and pastes of different sections from that link for reference and comment by others:

    Doing It Right (DIR) is a holistic approach to scuba diving that encompasses several essential elements, including fundamental diving skills, teamwork, physical fitness, and streamlined and minimalistic equipment configurations. DIR proponents maintain that through these elements, safety is improved by standardizing equipment configuration and dive-team procedures for preventing and dealing with emergencies.[1]

    • Equipment must be selected[2] such that it is suitable for more advanced diving practise. Such equipment should be consistently reliable and offer adequate performance for the more extreme environments it may be used in. It is proposed that this equipment also be suitable for less advanced activities.
    • Redundancy in equipment configuration is necessary in main life-support systems. Part of this redundancy must be provided by the diver, and part can be provided by the combined team.
    • Equipment must be minimised to only what is essential to minimise failure modes and accomplish the tasks of the dive.
    Doing It Right is about diving safely for personal enjoyment of the underwater environment[7] The principle of buddy support and teamwork using basic, well practiced, familiar and standardised safety procedures is central to the philosophy. Use of simple, reliable, well matched and rugged equipment that is versatile in its application, and familiar to all team members is seen as the logical way to achieve the highest levels of teamwork and as a means of minimizing task loading on the divers by reducing drag, and allowing good trim and buoyancy control, maneuverability and freedom of movement and low risk of entanglement. The familiar DIR equipment configuration is a means to this end.[8]

    Equipment[edit]
    DIR proponents say equipment configuration should be simple, streamlined, exactly sufficient or minimalistic and applicable to all diving situations, from shallow reef diving to long cave penetrations.[2] It must also be appropriate for reliable team support, so the configuration of each diver's equipment must be familiar to all members of the dive team[8]

    Streamlined equipment and standardised configuration[edit]
    The standard DIR equipment configuration is fairly well established.[12] The configuration has been designed and evolved to work in all situations. The intention was to improve a diver's efficiency and overall convenience and minimise risk. The configuration is minimalist and streamlined, and equipment should not hang free, stick out or increase drag unnecessarily, or cause entanglement.[2]

    Balance and trim[edit]
    The DIR rig is carefully weighted to ensure that the diver is not overweight but is able to maintain accurate depth and trim at any decompression stop. This requires assessment of how each component part fits into and affects the buoyancy characteristics of the configuration as a whole.[2] The choice of cylinder size and material must be chosen with due consideration of the effects on buoyancy and trim in conjunction with the selection of dive suit[8]

    Standardisation of safety procedures and drills[edit]
    There are several standardised procedures and safety drills developed by the DIR community. These include:

    • Breathing the primary—The primary regulator used during the dive for breathing the back gas is the long hose on the right cylinder valve. The secondary/backup regulator is on the left cylinder valve and is held under the chin on an elastic "necklace"
    • Bubble check—to ensure there are no leaks or before committing to the dive. Divers check each other's equipment for bubbles indicating leaks. specifically around first stages, second stages, and gas hoses and fittings and make a general visual check that everything is in place.
    • S-Drill—short for safety drill—is a simulated donation of the long hose to ensure that it deploys freely and is routed correctly.
      • In a modified S-drill the long hose is deployed before entering the water to make sure it is free.
      • In a full S-Drill the divers descend a few metres and perform simulated out of gas exercises so that they all get practice at sharing gas.
    • Valve Drill—to make sure the back gas cylinder and manifold valves are fully open and that the diver can open and close them.
      • In a modified valve drill the diver reaches back and checks that the valves are fully open.
      • In a full valve drill the valves are closed and re-opened in sequence and the regulators checked while a team member stands by in case of problems.
     
  7. Andy Stevenson

    Andy Stevenson Administrator

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    You've answered your own question, sort of. The reference is to JJ's book Doing it Right: The Fundamentals of Better Diving.
     
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  8. Gareth Burrows

    Gareth Burrows Super Moderator
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    Read carefully

    this bit...

    The standard DIR equipment configuration is fairly well established.[12]

    now click on the link to [12] and you'll see

    Jablonski, Jarrod (2006). Doing it Right: The Fundamentals of Better Diving.

    This is the book everyone refers to when really defining DIR. Worth reading that if you want to know more about the equipment configuration. I'm pretty confident I know what it says. I've just helped rewrite it. I'd be happy to to loan you a copy.
     
    hawk likes this.
  9. hawk

    hawk Doing It Rong
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    OK - that link didn't work on my tablet but now I'm on a laptop my argument is pretty much fubar'd :) In which case, I apologise - I was wrong.

    And yes, I actually wouldn't mind having a read of the book - I love the detail and understanding the thoughts behind all of this. And if I can make my way through Deco for Divers I can get through anything :)

    PM me your paypal address / bank details and I'll cover the cost of posting it.
     
  10. jb2cool

    jb2cool Moderator
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    Interested in the re-write but for me Deco for Divers was an easier read than The Fundamentals of Better Diving.
     
  11. Gareth Burrows

    Gareth Burrows Super Moderator
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    try reading this as a start. It's not mine. It was published in Sport Diver about a decade ago. The equipment configuration has evolved slightly but it's still very much the core of the DIR configuration

    http://www.divedir.com/media/dir.pdf
     
  12. Zubar

    Zubar Active Member
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    saved for future consumption, thanks Garf, looks interesting.
     

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