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Buddy commando bcd

Discussion in 'Dive Equipment' started by Alan Davies, Mar 4, 2017.

  1. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
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    Nope sorry, still don't work :p

    The dictionary definition is quite clear regardless of what's generally accepted.

    If you want to add a whole load of other attributes that make a life-jacket better
    and even if one of those attributes are a very common feature, then fill your boots.

    It won't make not one bit of difference to that simple dictionary definition that
    both a life jacket without this feature and a life jacket with this feature is still called
    a life jacket.
     
  2. hawk

    hawk Doing It Rong
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  3. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
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    Just like the use of the word "theory" by god bothererers on a doorstep. They don't mean 'theory' in the form of a concept subjected to serious scientific rigour, instead they use the word as they do in an episode of Scuby Doo - "I've got a theory...".
     
    hawk likes this.
  4. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
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    No it's not incorrect it's historically accurate.

    Sure the world has moved on and something may become more advanced or even change, but the original definition
    cannot be changed without degrading the original concept and language. Bit ironic that you are talking about eroding the
    language when that's exactly what's been done by the acceptance of change to the original concept. .

    The original lifejckets were made of cork and the only function they had was to float the user at the surface. Sure inflatable
    came in and better designs floated the user face-up, but that in itself doesn't change the original description of the word.
    even if nowdays that feature is present in the vast majority of life-jackets.
     
  5. hawk

    hawk Doing It Rong
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    Wrong. It is only more recently that it has been colloquially referenced as a life jacket. In much the same way as we call most vacuum cleaners Hoovers.

    It was not called a life jacket - because the phrase had not been coined.
     
  6. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
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    Well I thought i'd just ask a Maritime Archaeologist as we have a fair few in my club :)

    Early flotation devices using cork were in use from around 1800.
    The first "safety vest" the origin of the modern life-jacket is credited to Captain Ward, a Royal National Lifeboat Institution Inspector
    who created a cork vest in 1854 to be worn by lifeboat crews for buoyancy and warmth.
    By the early 1900's they started to appear on passenger ships and the term "safety vest" had been dropped in favour of the more
    appropriate or rather more likely to be taken seriously "life-jacket" (the exception being the Americans who used the term "life-preserver").


    Early cork life-jackets did not float the user face up

    [​IMG]

    I suppose we can now have a pendants argument about the definition of "recent", in language terms is 100 years recent or history :p

    Anyway i'm done with the pendant stuff for the day :)
     
    #86 Tel, May 19, 2017
    Last edited: May 19, 2017
    Tribal Chestnut likes this.
  7. Autolycus

    Autolycus New Member

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    Hi all, I'm new to this forum, though have been messing around underwater since 1985 - where I was dragged underwater by a lady PADI instructor, in the warm, gin-clear waters around Muscat in Oman - with marine life abounding. I'd been snorkelling in various places around the globe as a by-product of working in 'Er majesty's Flying Club, in places like RAF Gan in the Maldives (Addu Atoll, southernmost island, 180 miles north of the equator - so oodles of marine life in the lagoon), so had my own basic kit and used to do Surface Cover for a local BSAC club. On the day I lost my underwater breathing cherry, it was a case of putting on fins & mask and off we went to 10 metres - with me breathing from this lady's octopus - no problems.
    It wasn't quite as spontaneous as that, as I'd been briefed on not holding one's breath on ascent, keeping breathing and ear clearing - which I was already familiar with from deep snorkelling. Suffice to say I was hooked on the underwater world from that day onwards, and signed up for a PADI course as the BSAC club in our beach complex wasn't training new divers at the time. A year later and with over 200 dives in my logbook, a group of us had started a second BSAC special branch in that same (military) beach club, with me as Equipment Officer - probably because I managed to "Find" a military 3-phase, trailer-mounted HP compressor that would happily charge six cylinders to 232 bar at a time. Obviously that meant 'Finding" a spare building (portacabin), laying in single & 3-phase electrical power, plumbing in fresh water, acquiring boats, engines and trailers - that's another saga, all on its own - and, of course, a large beer fridge, air conditioning and looking after increasing amounts of equipment. Luckily, as a licensed aircraft engineer and working on a variety of aircraft & engine systems by then, fettling a basic Conshelf 14 or Scubapro Mk V wasn't too difficult - with access to every O-ring seal you can imagine and an ultrasonic cleaning bath too. I was even able to master the intricacies of dismantling, servicing, assembling and tuning the GSD Spinnaker that I was presented with as a non-working challenge - and those that have struggled with such devices will know what I'm talking about.
    We must have laid some reasonably solid foundations, as when I finally left Oman (as D/O), our club had two boats & trailers, the clubhouse, the original compressor plus a new Bristol item (in its own air-conditioned, brick-built compressor room), plus a portable compressor for "Eid" expeditions, plus several complete sets of club kit for training & new members to borrow, plus a regular training programme and annual BSAC Instructor courses run by visiting BSAC Instructor trainers. We also dived with our "own" visiting whale shark every January (cold water - had to wear a 3mm full wetsuit), had charted most of the regular dive sites around Fahal island ("Fahal" means Shark, in Arabic, so being surrounded by grey reefies was not unusual), and under it (the island had an underwater tunnel below it, around 100 metres in length with a 30-degree dogleg in the middle - so was useful for training new divers in true "No-Clear-Surface" diving), especially when the probability of meeting a reef shark coming the other way was high..! Meeting Very large stingrays was commonplace - and when you gently approached one "up-slope" that was half-buried in the sand, you could gently tickle under one of its wingtips, as it lazily opened one eye, decided you were no threat, then pressed down as you pushed up on its outer extremity. One time I did this and the ray must have wanted to play as it erupted from the seabed as I moved away, then took up station to one side of me and followed me all the way back to the boat - like a (Very) large puppy dog... Or you could do the regular afternoon dive, decide conditions and logistics were good, then wait on the beach for the sun to start sinking and set off on a night dive. Sometimes, the water was so clear on such dives, that with moonlight enabling adequate night vision, you could turn your torch off and instantly become aware that the water was totally invisible - so the sensation of "Flying" underwater was enhanced. On other night dives, the phosphorescence in the water made every movement ethereal, with green swirls accompanying every gesture. Or you could (cautiously), stroke the velvety skin of free-swimming morays - and talking of large eels, the monster moray from the movie "The Deep" (Nick Nolte & Jacqueline Bissett), that chomps on the boss baddy at the end (oops - spoiler alert), had a big brother that lived under a certain section of table coral that had been snapped off its base in a bad storm and now housed such huge denizens.
    I could go on about Oman diving - but my main reason for this lengthy litany is to contribute to the AP Valves (now AP Diving), Auto Air saga.
    Having had a few Auto-Airs along the way - including having a new one fitted to an old but still serviceable Buddy Arctic ABLJ recently - I would like to throw a few drops of fuel on the fire of the Alternative Air Source argument. I have also used the excellent A.I.R.2 (Alternative Inflator Regulator), from Scubapro - in at least four of its iterations - and some of the other, similar combination inflator/regulators from other manufacturers. They all work in roughly the same way, they all have three buttons (inflate, dump and purge), but one of the main things to consider is that they are all designed to be installed on the end of the corrugated inflation/dump hose from your BCD. That means that they all fall readily to the diver's (Left) hand, so don't get put in BCD pockets, or tucked into long lengths of extra MP hose, or other variables. Basically, they are all mounted in the same place, on any BCD that they are fitted to, so cannot easily be lost or mistaken for something else. When you then make your primary regulator hose a little longer than usual - and ensure that you use one of the many High Quality, side-exhaust second stages from Poseidon, Oceanic or other brand leaders, you can begin to see where this is going.
    With an Auto-Air or AIR2 in place of a standard BCD inflator, your Buddy Check becomes simple - and we all carry out buddy checks, before every dive (ABC), don't we..?
    Brief your buddy that in the event of an out-of-air situation, he or she should immediately take to second stage that you are using - the one that they can see working and which is set up (as a side-exhaust unit), to work in any orientation or attitude.
    Let's be honest, in a Real out-of-air scenario, your buddy - or any passing diver with a problem - is quite likely to do just that anyway - so let 'em.
    Now the "receiver" has a good air supply and is breathing again. You will have noticed that someone has nicked your second stage, but you will have practiced this and simply switch to your Alternative Inflator/Regulator - pressing the purge button part as you pop it into your mouth and carry on breathing too. You can then assess the situation and (probably), begin a CBL, back to a safety stop depth. At that point, their own regulator may be working again, as you will have had time during the ascent to check their SPG and that their gas is turned on properly - but you will be in control of the situation and both of you will be breathing.
    Simple.
    One other detail that should be mentioned is that when trying on a new BCD, with such an Alternate Inflator/Regulator unit fitted, it is wise to put the mouthpiece in and turn your head to the right, to simulate breathing from the unit. Some lengths of corrugated hose - between inflator/regulator and BCD shoulder dump valve - are a little too short for comfortable breathing with the head turned, so you may have to fit a longer hose.
    It's also a good reason for investing in the Rolls-Royce of Regulators (made in Sweden), where their latest First Stage - the Xtreme - has a Ball-bearing at its heart and is truly effortless to breathe from - though may not the cheapest to buy..!
    There you go, an introduction and a touch of controversy, all in one. Now I'm bracing for a barrage of comments about current kit configuration, so don't get me started on the benefits of inverted, twin, 300-bar cylinders..!
    Dive safely - when you can,
     
    nickb likes this.

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